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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2015  |  Volume : 29  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 67-71

The comparison of sensitization to animal allergens in children and adult-onset patients with asthma


1 Allergy Research Center, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran
2 Allergy Research Center; Department of Immunology, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran
3 Ali Asghar Allergy Clinic, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran
4 Student Research Committee, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran

Correspondence Address:
Shirin Farjadian
Department of Immunology, Allergy Research Center, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Zand Street, 71348-45794, Shiraz
Iran
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0972-6691.178270

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Background: With higher exposure to animal during the life, the risk of sensitization to animals may get more. The purpose of this study was the comparison of sensitization to animal allergens in children with asthma from those with adult-onset asthma. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study included 100 children and 100 adults with asthma as well as 100 healthy individuals with no history of asthma and atopy. Skin tests were performed in patients and controls to allergens using a panel of 15 animal allergens. Results: The rate of sensitization to animal allergens was 33% in children with asthma and 39% in patients with adult-onset asthmatics compared to 10% in the control group. Children with asthma were most commonly sensitized to dog (10%), hamster (8%), and cat (7%). Among patients with adult-onset asthma, the most common sensitizations were to dog (19%), canary (14%), and cat and goat (each 7%). The frequency of sensitization to animal allergens was not significantly different between children and adult-onset patients with asthma. Conclusions: We observed that sensitization to dog and canary was higher in adult-onset than children with asthma. Efforts to improve conditions at the public buildings to reduce the load of airborne allergens are also potentially helpful.


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